iPads are not just cool, they also can help some with AMD keep in touch with the world

my mom with AMD using her iPad
my mom with AMD using her iPad
Mom using her iPad

Since my mother developed age-related macular degeneration (AMD), she has been trying everything to see. A $3,000 plus reading machine did not help her. In fact, she’s tried two of them. Handheld magnifiers help a bit, but can be exhausting. But one day we were sitting on the couch and she saw my iPhone.  She asked what it was and I told her it was my iPhone. I showed it to her, not really expecting that she’d be able to see it, but I thought she’d get a kick out of Siri. All of a sudden she said, “Why can I see this?”

 “If you can see this, you can probably see my iPad,”  I said.

I ran and got my iPad and she was in heaven.  Within a week we were at the Apple store buying her one. She can play solitaire, get her email, watch Netflix, keep track of her stock and watch her news stations and cable shows. Is it perfect? No, it’s not. But it is better than nearly anything else she’s tried, and unlike just helping her read documents, the iPad keeps her in touch with the world.

I wasn’t sure if this was an anomaly or not until I heard about a recent study presented as a poster at the  American Academy of Ophthalmology’s 2012 meeting that showed that backlit devices such as the iPad helped people with moderate vision loss such as age-related macular degeneration (ARMD) read more easily and comfortably. Continue reading “iPads are not just cool, they also can help some with AMD keep in touch with the world”